FA plan life bans for yobs who broke into Wembley for Euro 2020 final as independent review set up


The FA plan life bans for yobs who broke into Wembley for Euro 2020 final with independent review set up to investigate the disorder and security breaches that enabled thousands of fans to enter stadium without tickets

  • The FA will take action on fans who broke into the ground for the Euro 2020 final
  • The yobs will receive life bans from England matches and Wembley Stadium 
  • An independent review will be chaired by Baroness Casey of Blackstock

The FA are planning to issue life bans from England matches and Wembley Stadium to fans identified as having broken into the ground for the Euro 2020 final.

The governing body announced on Monday that an independent review, chaired by Baroness Casey of Blackstock, has been set up to investigate the disorder which overshadowed England’s attempt to win a first major trophy for 55 years. 

The review will seek to establish whether the Metropolitan Police, the FA or UEFA were most culpable for the security breaches that enabled thousands of supporters to enter the stadium without tickets.

An independent review has been set up to investigate the disorder at the Euro 2020 final

An FA statement read: ‘A key emphasis of the findings will be to ensure such disgraceful scenes are never repeated.’

Staff were ‘overwhelmed’ and authorities estimate up to 200,000 were in the Wembley area. 

The Metropolitan Police, responsible for law and order outside the stadium, denied that they failed in this task, though witnesses told of drug-dealing, drug consumption, drunken and aggressive behaviour, as well as male fans urinating in the streets.

Security barriers were compromised after a surge of thugs broke into the national stadium

Security barriers were compromised after a surge of thugs broke into the national stadium

The stadium perimeter and internal security are the FA’s responsibility. 

Those without tickets forced their way through turnstiles due to their large numbers and ‘tailgating’ genuine ticket-holders — squeezing through electronic turnstiles behind paying customers, who were threatened not to draw attention.